Building Regulations

CARBON MONOXIDE, BUILDING REGULATIONS AND OTHER INFORMATION


CARBON MONOXIDE POISIONING

Carbon monoxide is a serious health risk. It is a silent killer and can be present wherever fuels are burnt. In Ireland there are an average of 6 deaths each year attributed to the accidental inhalation of Carbon Monoxide.


This figure comes nowhere near the full extent of those effected by the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. The symptoms can range from tiredness, dizzy spells, headaches, diarrhoea, chest pains or fainting. As Carbon Monoxide is colourless and odourless most people are unaware that the problems they are having are even associated with carbon monoxide poisoning.


CARBON MONOXIDE CAN BE FATAL. Incorrectly installed appliances, damaged flues and chimneys, lack of sufficient ventilation to appliances and poor cleaning and maintenance will all increase the risk of carbon monoxide in your home.



BUILDING REGULATIONS 2014

All works, including modifications, installations and repairs carried out to you flue or chimney are strictly covered by the Technical guidance Documents of the Irish Building Regulations 2014. (Document J, Heat producing appliances). These documents set out the minimum requirements that should be adhered to, in order to make sure you get the best performance from your appliance put more importantly for the safety and welfare of the occupants of the property and to protect the property itself.


These regulations now require the competently trained and experienced person who has carried out the works to certify the work with the customer, signing off on the said work and to install a Notice Plate before Commissioning the chimney safe for use.


It also clearly defines the responsibilities required of the owner/occupier in relation to proper maintenance, cleaning and use of your appliance and chimney.



HEALTH AND SAFETY

The days of turning a blind eye to health and safety should well be gone. In Ireland there are specific guidelines to protect construction workers but there a particular rules and guidelines to protect those that work at height. They are laid out in Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (construction) regulations 2013. A brief of these guidelines can be found in the Code of Practice for Safety in Roofwork. (HSA Document)

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